Difference between revisions of "NCS: Message Transfer Systems"

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{{cds270-2 header}} <!-- Generates the header, including table of contents and link back to main page -->
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<!-- Enter a 1 paragraph description of the contents of the lectureMake sure to include any key concepts, so that the wiki search feature will pick them up -->
This lecture describes different choices for ''message transfer systems'' in a networked control system.  The message transfer system is responsible for managing network communications between computers and software modules with the control system.  We focus on systems that are build on top of the TCP/IP protocol stackDesign choices include how to encode information in packets, whether to broadcast or send packets point-to-point, and whether to retransmit packets on lost data transmissionBecause of the closed loop nature of the networked embedded systems that we are programming, timing and latency are critical issuesWe focus on the use of [[spread]] as a specific example of a low-level message transfer subsystem and describe how it can be used in a NCS context.
This is the template for CDS 270 lecturesIf you edit this page, you will see comments describing what goes in each section'''Do not edit this template.''' See [[CDS 270: Information for Lecturers]] for more information on how to create a wiki page corresponding to a lecture.


== Lecture Materials ==
== Lecture Materials ==
<!-- Include links to materials that you used in your lecture.  At a minimum, this should include a link to your lecture presentation.  You might also include links to MATLAB scripts or other source code that students would find useful -->
* [[Media:L1-1_mta.pdf|Lecture: Message Transfer Architectures]]
<!-- Sample lecture link: * [[Media:L1-1_Intro.pdf|Lecture: Networked Control Systems: Course Overview]] -->


== Reading ==
== Reading ==
<!-- A reading list for the lecture. This will typically be 3-5 articles or book chapters that are particularly relevant to the material being presented. The reading list should be annotated to explain how the articles fit into the topic for the lecture. -->
* <p>[http://www.cnds.jhu.edu/pub/papers/spread.pdf The Spread Wide Area Group Communication System], Y. Amir and J. Stanton.
Technical Report CNDS-98-4, The Center for Networking and Distributed Systems, The Johns Hopkins University, 1998.  The paper provides an overview of the [http://www.spread.org Spread Toolkit], which provides a simple mechanism for networked communications.</p>


== Additional Resources ==
== Additional Resources ==
<!-- Links to additional information. If there are good sources of additional information for students interested in exploring this topic further, these should go at the bottom of the page. -->
<!-- Links to additional information. If there are good sources of additional information for students interested in exploring this topic further, these should go at the bottom of the page. -->

Revision as of 03:40, 26 March 2006

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This lecture describes different choices for message transfer systems in a networked control system. The message transfer system is responsible for managing network communications between computers and software modules with the control system. We focus on systems that are build on top of the TCP/IP protocol stack. Design choices include how to encode information in packets, whether to broadcast or send packets point-to-point, and whether to retransmit packets on lost data transmission. Because of the closed loop nature of the networked embedded systems that we are programming, timing and latency are critical issues. We focus on the use of spread as a specific example of a low-level message transfer subsystem and describe how it can be used in a NCS context.

Lecture Materials

Reading

Technical Report CNDS-98-4, The Center for Networking and Distributed Systems, The Johns Hopkins University, 1998. The paper provides an overview of the Spread Toolkit, which provides a simple mechanism for networked communications.

Additional Resources